Recent work

I recently published columns on torture post 9/11, raising the minimum wage, and children appearing before immigration judges without counsel.

One of the more regrettable moments in recent American history was the Bush administration’s decision to authorize torture as a tool for obtaining intelligence post 9/11.  In my column in Al Jazeera, I argue that President Obama’s decision “to look forward” and not investigate these crimes is a mistake.  In turning away from the past, we forfeit the chance to archive history and understand what happened and why; we surrender the opportunity to ensure that fear and its terrible consequences do not reign triumphant again; and we devalue the rule of law, and its prohibition against torture, a principle eight centuries in the making.

On raising the minimum wage, the evidence speaks for itself: America’s workers are shouldering more but receiving less.  A full-time minimum wage employee earns $14,500 a year, roughly $4,000 below the poverty line for a single mother with two children.  If the minimum wage had kept pace with inflation since 1968, it would now be almost $10.60 an hour.  If it had kept pace with increases in employee productivity, it would now be $22.00 an hour.  You can read more in The Christian Science Monitor.

Despite immigration to the U.S. falling to a record-low, the number of unaccompanied minors seeking entry is at an all-time high.  Forcing these children to brave immigration court without counsel is as farcical as it is shameful.  You can read more at Al Jazeera.

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